Category Archives: E-news

What’s the big idea?

Ever since big names like Harvey Weinstein, Roger Ailes, Charlie Rose, Larry Nassar and other high-profile celebrities, politicians and newsmakers made headlines for sexual assault and harassment, women all over the world have responded to the #MeToo rallying cry. This cause was most pronounced in the Supreme Court Justice nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, and have politicized a once bipartisan issue. Better or worse, these news stories and the #MeToo movement in general has elevated this cause, and victim empowerment in general to ensure these individuals are not silenced. While we know what is happening at the national level, I was curious about one particular organization (a former client) and how this has impacted their work.


BIG QUESTION:

How has the #MeToo Movement impacted organizations that primarily serve women and girls at the local level?


Focus on Girls’ Empowerment

Last month I had the pleasure of speaking with a former client, Elizabeth McGlynn, Executive Director of Girls on the Run of Montgomery County. I asked her about the #MeToo Movement in general has impacted their work, and she shared some interesting feedback that it has and hasn’t changed what they do. Girls on the Run International was developed with the premise that the collective power of girls working towards the goal of running a 5k, coupled with coaches that led a curriculum focused on building their self-confidence will help build their self-esteem, self-worth, and allow them to feel accomplished. Their programming begins when girls are eight years old and coincides with the drop in girls’ confidence levels after age nine, and can plummet after middle school. Using this proven approach to counteract this decreased self-esteem, Girls on the Run already has a baked in solution and did not have to change who they are as an organization because of #MeToo.

Elizabeth did share though that while the girls are receiving the same type of programming, and that hasn’t changed, more adult women and men are interested in becoming coaches and are extremely supportive of the curriculum used. Many even say that they wish they had such a program growing up in their own communities (when they battled confidence issues themselves). Given the organization’s well-established reputation in the community, they continue to have a number of sponsors and there is public interest in their work. In addition, Girls on the Run International serves as the advocacy arm for the organization and is pushing out strong messages about women and empowerment, and these messages are magnified to funders and parents.

While there is no local task force to address these issues, Montgomery County remains supportive of the cause and in general encouraging women and other victims to speak out and share their stories. The Girls on the Run message is geared towards girls having a voice and being able to speak their minds. Seen this way, Girls on the Run was at the forefront of this cause and offers a solution to empower girls during a time when they are most vulnerable.

What should we learn from this?

Some ways that we should think about this issue and how to address it locally are to:

Empowerment is central to success, whether it be in response to the #MeToo movement, overcoming job loss, mental health issues or other challenges. What is your organization doing to empower clients to become their best advocates?

Don’t Fix the Wheel if your programs are already successful and have proven results. This could mean that your solution is what a funder or partner is looking for.

Policy Changes within your organization might be needed if there are no safeguards in place to protect victims from assault and harassment.

How is your community responding to the #MeToo movement? Are there additional working groups set up to address this issue? Are you building in new service offerings? 

What’s the big idea?

While most of us are aware of the fact that there are inequities across the country, it is most fervently felt in the area of housing. Major cities across the United States showcases this divide, especially as mortgage rates, rental prices and interest rates rise, but there is limited housing to support those who are being pushed out by high prices. While we all believe in the American Dream and boosting innovation and entrepreneurship, some areas are feeling this directly, especially Seattle and Denver. In these areas in particular, there are higher than average rates of homelessness, and the income gap is felt most acutely. What is being done to address these crises and prevent others from falling through the cracks?


BIG QUESTION:

What are organizations doing to create more low-income housing, especially in high net worth communities?


Case Studies: A boom or a bust?

Since Microsoft set up its headquarters in Seattle, Washington, highly educated and high net worth individuals have flocked to the Northwest. This has only been compounded by the growth of such companies as Amazon and Starbucks in the area as well. Housing prices used to be in sync with other cities, but now many areas have become unaffordable. While Microsoft has pledged $500 million to the city to counteract the housing crisis, this won’t help the systemic challenges that individuals and families face in finding housing, and those who are experiencing homelessness.

Denver is experiencing the same crisis as the state’s vote to legalize marijuana usage has led to a cottage industry, which has stimulated economic development and tourism throughout the state. However, even though cranes for new construction dot the city, there is a rising homeless population and movement of individuals to exurbs and areas further outside the city limits.

What can be done to address these challenges? In his book, “Generation Priced Out,” Randy Shaw, Director of San Francisco’s Tenderloin Housing Clinic advocates for rental control rules, and zoning deregulation to promote equity rather than the inclusion of low-income housing units in new housing developments. Some argue differently and say that the inclusion of low-income housing units in these developments promotes fairness and integration. The main issue they say is the dearth of housing, as the waiting list to obtain one of these units can be quite long. Philanthropy alone cannot fix this problem and while big donations from companies like Microsoft and Amazon will help in the short-term, what about the rising housing prices in these areas? When will the bubble burst as it did in 2008?

  • 50% experienced an uptick in services required, but only 30%had adequate supplies to serve them. Of those, 60% had to tap into their reserves.
  • Even though just over 50% of the respondents receive Federal funding, multiple other organizations were impacted.

What should we learn from this?

Some ways that we should think about this issue and how to address it locally are to:

Work collaboratively across agencies and organizations to address these issues from a collective perspective, and include those impacted by the housing crunch. Task forces and working group are popping up to address these issues, and also look at them from a bottom up perspective.

Align issues with affordable housing to show how this issue impacts so many other areas including food scarcity, income levels, education, just to name a few.

Make a case and tell a story about how a lack of housing can truly impact people’s lives. This can be the difference between living on the streets, a temporary stay in a shelter or permanent housing.

Does housing scarcity impact your community? What are local organizations and agencies doing to address this issue?

What’s the big idea?

Unless you weren’t watching the news the past few months, you were probably very aware that a Federal government partial shutdown took place earlier this year. While this impacted more people than others, as someone living in the Washington, DC area this actually felt personal. While we won’t go into the politics behind this decision, we can agree that many people experienced severe hardships as a hefty percentage of people do not have adequate savings to sustain themselves during a difficult period without pay and, some were forced to work without pay. Since the Federal government was unable to provide support, this fell to nonprofits and local government agencies to address these challenges. I am focusing on two organizations, Interfaith Works and Manna Food Center to describe what they experienced and also share more via a report published by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG) and survey published by the Center for Nonprofit Advancement.

 


BIG QUESTION:

How did community-based organizations and local government agencies respond to the Federal shutdown?


Case Study: The collective impact of a local response

Speaking with Manna Food Center and Interfaith Works, it reinforced two things: 1) Nonprofits provide critical support during times of crisis and 2) They do work together towards a common goal when a great need arises. Manna shared that they had an uptick in need with an additional 106 households receiving food (translating to 325 people in total with 129 being children). They actually waived their income eligibility requirements so furloughed employees could receive food. They also received an extra 28,000 pounds of donated food and leveraged the MLK Day of Service for an additional 200 volunteers providing support. Interfaith Works offered more referral support through their IW Connections program and worked with Pepco to relax rules to offer emergency assistance support for people unable to pay their rental or utilities. Fortunately, this was not needed as the Shutdown ended before the funds were utilized. Both organizations also worked with the Montgomery County Council and other agencies and organizations to develop a coordinated response for information sharing, referrals and other emergency assistance needs. This led to a more collective response to deepen the level of support provided to those impacted.

MWCOG issued a report on February 2019 entitled Responding to the Partial Federal Government Shutdown that indicated, “During the shutdown, local governments stepped up and offered a wide range of support to area residents. They did so in coordination with a strong network of partners, including nonprofits, charities, faith-based organizations, utilities, and businesses, providing food, financial assistance, and employment services. Some jurisdictions offered free public transit to affected workers as well as reduced fees for city and county recreational opportunities. Many also shared information for people to cope with stress.” A survey of the impact of the shutdown conducted by the Center for Nonprofit Advancement of nonprofits in Maryland, Washington, DC and Virginia found that:

  • 50% experienced an uptick in services required, but only 30%had adequate supplies to serve them. Of those, 60% had to tap into their reserves.
  • Even though just over 50% of the respondents receive Federal funding, multiple other organizations were impacted.

 

What should we learn from this?

Local support matters – As demonstrated by these organizations, even situations at the Federal level have a direct impact in our community. The support of county and city agencies, nonprofits and other philanthropic funders and donors is critical during such emergency periods.

Be prepared – Sometimes a crisis cannot be averted. If your organization does not have a plan of action, that could deplete your reserves and greatly impact your ongoing programs. Can you develop such a plan with your board and also incorporate coordination with funders, in-kind partners and other stakeholders to plan ahead?

Nonprofits do more with less – The nonprofits continued to operate and were also willing to serve more people. The committed to the cause superseded the financial impact it would have on the organization. This showcases the deep connection to the organization’s mission and dedication to the population in need.

Collaborative responses work – When agencies and community-based organizations work together, great things happen. A strategic and thoughtful response can be extremely effective and necessary during times of need.

How would you respond to a crisis within your organization? Are you able to set up appropriate measure to accept more people and do more work?

 I am venturing into a new format for my blog posts to not just talk about grants, but about what’s happening in the world. Every few weeks we will be digging into a big issue and talking about how it relates to nonprofits, government agencies, and the philanthropic sector. The first post focuses on racial inequities and how the philanthropic and nonprofit/public sectors are responding. I am thrilled to share that many organizations are tackling this issue head-on. In my neck of the woods, The Washington Regional Association of Grantmakers has established a Racial Equity Working Group; Nonprofit Montgomery will be hosting a forum on racial equity in May; and Maryland Nonprofits is hosting an Equity Speaker Series starting in March (and these are just three examples).

I look forward to sharing how responsive and flexible we are regarding these issues, and also thinking of how to incorporate new perspectives.

Check out my first issue here: https://conta.cc/2DlRtkN