I was looking for birthday cards at a nearby Hallmark store and there was a sign that read “Be Kind to Strangers – They May Give you Money.” I had to laugh at this, since it is very true (and very applicable as a grant writer). We spend an inordinate amount of time crafting a well-constructed proposal, cultivating relationships with funders and preparing progress reports on the grants we receive. However, what about those individuals who may be interested in supporting your organization, but aren’t deemed as “worthy” of cultivation?

Volunteers – Treat volunteers with kindness and gratitude. Not only is this in-kind support, these individuals are integral to programmatic success and organizational operations.

Donors that contribute small amounts – Those who contribute smaller amounts are generally not consid

ered “major donors” and may not be cultivated in the same way. How do you thank these

individuals? Do you have an annual thank-a-thon? Do you send a photo or personalized message with you thank you note? Do you keep them updated on organizational activities? How do you let them know their contribution of $50 is as meaningful as those who donate $500?

In-Kind Donations – These donations of furniture, equipment and/or time allow organizations to focus on spending funds on programmatic activities versus operating expenses. Are you thanking them in a meaningful way?

Event Attendees – Perhaps you held an event, collected signature, but that person did not initially become a donor. What are you doing to keep them informed and show that their attendance and participation in events are contributions in and of themselves.

How can you cultivate kindness within your organization?

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